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Long Road to Mercy by David Baldacci (Atlee FBI #1)

David Baldacci

New York Times bestselling author David Baldacci introduces a remarkable new character: Atlee Pine, an FBI special agent assigned to the remote wilds of the western United States. Ever since her twin sister was abducted by a notorious serial killer at age five, Atlee has spent her life hunting down those who hurt others. And she’s the best at it. She could be one of the Bureau’s top criminal profilers, if she didn’t prefer catching criminals in the vast wilderness of the West to climbing the career ladder in the D.C. office. Her chosen mission is a lonesome one–but that suits her just fine.

Now, Atlee is called in to investigate the mutilated carcass of a mule found in the Grand Canyon–and hopefully, solve the disappearance of its rider. But this isn’t the only recent disappearance. In fact, it may be just the first clue, the key to unravelling a rash of other similar missing persons cases in the canyon. . .

It was about this time last year that I read David Baldacci’s book The Christmas Train, a real good feeling book about, you’ve guessed it, Christmas! It’s the same old story – travelling at Christmas in inclement weather, and an adventure with plenty of intrigue. I think I was twenty pages in when I suddenly thought this would make a charming film and guess what, they made one! I digress! Halfway through Long Road to Mercy there’s a thrilling scene set on a train travelling across America, it made me think of David’s previous book! Plenty of subject matter and imagination available there then!

Long Road to Mercy – David Baldacci

So this time around we are introduced to Atlee Pine, Baldacci’s first female lead and in a time of #metoo and sexual equality Atlee has arrived just in time, in fact her timing is impeccable. She’s a ballsy character and one who knows what she wants and how to get it. She’s intelligent and clever and can beat most men at hand to hand combat, she also has a soft side but that takes a little coaxing out!

Atlee carries a lot of baggage as we soon discover, attacked at the age of 5 in her own bedroom, the abduction of her twin sister Mercy that same night, helps mould her into the fierce loner we are introduced to. She doesn’t enjoy relationships, a loner as I’ve just said and someone who’s really not interested in climbing the corporate FBI ladder. Give her a beer at the end of the day and she’s happy.

Atlee Pine’s name came to me very swiftly. I wrote it down and then thought about what sort of character I wanted to build from that. As a writer, I think you can tell when you want to stretch your wings and challenge yourself to do something different. Writing a female as the lead protagonist was something different for me, and it was a challenge for me as a male to write a female character. Doing something different with each book is what drives me as a writer and what keeps me excited. I hope this means that readers are excited when they’re reading it too.

Long Road to Mercy moves at a frenetic pace, helped in part by great characterisation – especially Atlee and her secretary Blum – who following a sticky beginning, click and help carry the storyline along. I really enjoyed the story, how Baldacci brought in relevant and current international topics of concern – Russia and North Korea to name but two – and the bad guys you find yourself hating! It always amazes me how authors can get this reaction out of readers but it helps when you have an author at the top of his game.

The length is just about spot on but the final third flies by in the blink of an eye with quick chapters and great adventure. The only question left is who will end on top and will Atlee save the day? I guess you’ll just have to read the book to find out – I know!

Long Road to Mercy will be published on November 15th, 2018 by Pan Macmillan.

The Hanging Club by Tony Parsons – My Thoughts

The Hanging Club

A band of vigilante executioners roam London’s hot summer nights, abducting evil men and hanging them by the neck until dead.

SENTENCED TO DEATH
– The gang member who’s abused vulnerable girls.
– The wealthy drunk driver who’s mowed down a child.
– The hate preacher calling for the murder of British soldiers.

As the bodies pile up and riots explode across the sweltering city, DC Max Wolfe hunts a gang of killers who many believe to be heroes.

And discovers that the lust for revenge starts very close to home …

A thoroughly entertaining read, the book flows well from beginning to end, full of intrigue and murder, DC Wolfe returns for another challenging case.

A very simple but clever concept – no idea why this hasn’t been done before – it doesn’t take long for this this book to scream into life. Videos suddenly begin appearing online, not your average youtube video mind you, there’s no Michael Buble or cover artist in site. Someone’s hanging people and posting them for others to enjoy what turns out to be a gratifying revenge kill. One hanging follows another and it becomes apparent very quickly that the victims who turn up in Tyburn aren’t that nice.

The victims have a dark and unsavoury past and once this becomes apparent to a public hypnotised by the killings the police are fighting a loosing battle, especially with the press corp who appear to be supporting the group of vigilantes responsible. DC Max Wolf certainly has his work cut out for himself and only time will tell if he can get through to the end safely and find those responsible.

With each kill comes additional information and subtle clues. The police can’t find the kill zone and have no idea where these hangings are occurring. What they do discover rather quickly is roughly where the bodies will pop up – but that really doesn’t help their cause initially.

This is the first Max Wolfe book I’ve read and although it would be better for continuity purposes if I’d read the previous adventures I didn’t feel as if this fact hindered my enjoyment at all. Max is a great character and a determined one at that. He has his fair share of scrapes in The Hanging club, that’s what protagonists are fore aren’t they?!

The pace is good and the introduction of numerous supporting characters is well thought out, not once did I feel that a character was introduced just for the sake of it. I can’t wait to read the next DC Max Wolfe, he’s found a new fan in this reader that’s for sure.

Hardcover: 416 pages

  • Publisher: Century (19 May 2016)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1780892373
  • ISBN-13: 978-1780892375

Promise Falls Trilogy by Linwood Barclay – Thoughts

I was sitting around thinking what to read a few weeks ago and I came across The Twenty Three – book number three in the Promise Falls Trilogy – for some reason I’d not come across the series before now. The description on the dust jacket certainly caught my attention so I ordered Broken Promise, the first of three books following the inhabitants of Promise Falls.

I really enjoyed the book, very easy to read, interesting characters and a decent plot. I did find it moved around a little in the middle but on the whole it was very enjoyable. Despite an average ending, Broken Promise is one of those books you can’t really put down and the fact that it leaves you wanting more is testament to Barclay’s ability to suck the reader in.

Far From True is an interesting one, I definitely thought this was a stronger story than the first in the trilogy and now that I’m two books in – I’ll definitely read the third because this books leaves you wanting to know what happens to the main characters. Most of the work has been done by this point, you have a vested interested into the lives of the detectives and everyone else in the small community.

The advantage of reading these books after all three have been published is fairly obvious – as long as one has the time to read them back to back there’s no delay in waiting for the next book to be published. You can follow the entire story from start to finish in quick succession!

Far From True isn’t as confusing as the first one. Everything made sense, characters developed well and unlike the first book, I didn’t have to think too hard to establish a connection with the characters. A well thought out and structured story, I can’t wait to see what happens next although one of the characters I wanted to see in the final instalment isn’t in it so that’s slightly disappointing! Excellent read and very enjoyable – quick too!

We’ve reached the end of the Trilogy, and in rather quick time I may add. Not only is the entire story set over one month but I managed to read all three books in a fortnight. Not once did I tire of the characters or location, to be honest I wanted it to continue after I closed the final book – we are never satisfied are we?!

The Twenty Three ties up all the loose ends with a gripping final storyline. People are dying after drinking the local water but no one can figure out what happened. It’s left to Detective Duckworth to try and solve this impossible crime. The urge to drink water is strong!

It’s not all about the water in this final chapter, there are many other relationships to sort out and put to bed. I was slightly disappointed with the way one finished, there was more than enough time to end it well but it just felt rushed. Overall this book – and the previous two titles – were a success. I look forward to reading more about Promise Falls in the future.

Parting Shot – published in November 2017 follows on from this trilogy.

The Silent Room by Mari Hannah – Thoughts

The Silent Room by Mari Hannah

A security van sets off for Durham prison, a disgraced Special Branch officer in the back. It never arrives. On route it is hijacked by armed men, the prisoner sprung. Suspended from duty on suspicion of aiding and abetting the audacious escape of his former boss, Detective Sergeant Matthew Ryan is locked out of the investigation.

With a manhunt underway, Ryan is warned to stay away. Keen to preserve his career and prove his innocence, he backs off. But when the official investigation falls apart, under surveillance and with his life in danger, he goes dark, enlisting others in his quest to discover the truth. When the trail leads to the suspicious death of a Norwegian national, Ryan uncovers an international conspiracy that has claimed the lives of many.

I’m a little late to The Silent Room party, but then that’s nothing unusual, I’m always last to any party! Published in 2015 this is a stand alone publication, separate to the well known Kate Daniels series but fear not, nothing is missing from this book, it’s an incredible read.

I appear to be on something of a roll at the moment, I’ve been very fortunate to pick up two books this past week and have loved both of them, this one by Mari Hannah and Murder Games by James Patterson.

It’s not much to ask that a book reads well, a decent story and characters you want to believe in – is it? Well in this case you find all of these and more. It’s an incredibly flowing read from the very first page to the last and one that you really want to know what happens to the characters, who they are, their backstory and what happens to them. It doesn’t always happen of course but with The Silent Room I really felt connected to Ryan and O’Neil. I simply had a vested interest in their development. I really hope this isn’t the last we hear from this pair.

Every good book has to have a strong and opinionated protagonist and in Detective Sergeant Matthew Ryan we have that. He knows what has to be done and more or less how to achieve it but not afraid to ask for help and challenge anyone who happens to stand in his way. His character is colourful and balanced, to be honest I couldn’t fault him. He’s the kind of guy you’d love to share a drink with down the pub!

The storyline is strong as is the way the author leads the reader through a variety of scenarios and problem solving. I never felt lost, never confused, just confident that I knew that by the end of the book I’d be satisfied and left wanting more – in a good way. And I was!

I really enjoyed The Silent Room and although a couple of years old now, I urge you to read this – you won’t be disappointed! Mari Hannah – please write a follow up, I really want to know what happens next!

  • Hardcover: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Macmillan (19 Nov. 2015)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1447291042
  • ISBN-13: 978-1447291046

Murder Games by James Patterson & Howard Roughan

I have to say I really enjoyed this read. Murder Games is light, fluid and an incredibly quick and effortless read. The opening chapters are among the most entertaining I’ve read, certainly in the last year or so, introducing us to characters and plotlines so fast that if you blink you’d miss it!

Murder Games by James Patterson

I’ve read a few of James Patterson’s books, not all of them I hasten to add but more than enough to know what I like and what I don’t and the overriding feeling I get when reading his books is enjoyment. I really enjoy how he writes the books and how entertained I am with each turn of the page. It doesn’t matter whether you’re at the very beginning of the book, the middle or the end. If you’re lucky, as I feel you are in Murder Games, you’ll be thoroughly entertained from beginning to end.

There aren’t too many shocks here but the couple that were, they were so well done it was pure magic. One of the earlier surprises, and I won’t spoil it here, was delivered so subtly it really shocked me. I’m talking about two of the characters at this point, something I really hadn’t expected.

As the book ends and the authors – James is joined by Howard Roughan this time around – do not fall into the trap that so many authors do, they do not get sucked in and change relationships because it is the “done” thing. I loved how they kept certain relationships as they were meant to be. This paragraph will probably make little sense to anyone who hasn’t read the book, hopefully it will once you’ve read it!

Great characterisation, a thrill a minute read with short, sharp chapters – very much inkeeping with the Patterson tradition – that keep the story and sub plots moving at a frenetic pace. Not sure if we’ll see more of these characters in the future but I really do hope we will. Great job.

 

  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Century (1 Jun. 2017)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1780895380
  • ISBN-13: 978-1780895383

 

Phantom by Jo Nesbo – Thoughts

Phantom by Jo Nesbø

THE MURDER HAS BEEN SOLVED. BUT HAS JUSTICE BEEN DONE?

Harry Hole is back in Oslo. He’s been away for some time, but his ghosts have a way of catching up with him. The case that brings him back is already closed. There is no room for doubt: the young junkie was shot dead by a fellow addict.

THE POLICE DON’T WANT HIM BACK…

Denied permission to reopen the investigation, Harry strikes out on his own. Beneath the city’s eerie tranquillity, he discovers a trail of violence and mysterious disappearances seemingly unnoticed by the police. At every turn Harry is faced with a conspiracy of silence.

THE CRIMINALS DON’T WANT HIM BACK…

Harry is not the only one who is interested in the case. From the moment he steps off the plane, someone is watching his every move and tracing his every call.

SOMEONE WANTS HIM SILENCED.

I’ve recently re-read Phantom by Jo Nesbø following the release of The Snowman Film and thought I’d share a few of my thoughts about the book. Phantom is a terrific novel, one that will keep you turning the pages and on the edge of your seat from the very first moment you pick up the book right up until the powerful ending, the author placing you smack bang in the middle of a city torn by drug addiction, murder and corruption – politicians and policemen alike. Trust is at a premium and betrayal the key word of the day, believe me, you don’t want to miss this novel, it will shock and surprise. I certainly didn’t see the twist coming and I’m still reeling!

Very few authors write better than Nesbø in my eyes – aided once again by a superb translation by Don Bartlett – and I am so glad I’ve had the chance to read so many of his books, Phantom is the latest in a mesmerising series featuring the damaged Harry Hole. Alcoholic. Drug Addict. Policeman. Husband. Father.

I really have to make time to read some of his earlier titles that have somehow alluded me.

Phantom isn’t your typical Jo Nesbø novel; this is all about drugs and the devastation they cause both directly and indirectly. Everyone is affected in one way or another but Nesbø pulls no punches as he paints a different kind of Oslo from the one politicians and the tourist boards would like to promote. The streets are full of pushers and gangs hell-bent on cornering the market no matter the cost or who gets in the way; they certainly don’t take kindly to Harry Hole’s interference.

You won’t find an unhinged serial killer in Phantom but you will find murder most fowl and an ex-policeman in Hole struggling to secure the release of Oleg – his son – who has been arrested for the murder of a drug addict, a supplier and someone who just happens to be his best friend. Things are never clear cut and the way Nesbø weaves his magic is incredible. Take it as read, Nesbo mentions a character for a reason, there is no dead wood in this novel.

I’m not even going to mention the narrative there really is no point – you know what you’re going to get and you certainly won’t be disappointed! Suffice to say it’s both powerful and gripping and although this is a steady read without too much gore – certainly compared to The Snowman – for the first two thirds of the book, you’ll find with 120 pages to go the pace moves up a number of gears and you’ll struggle to put the book down. The way he hooks you in is sublime to say the least. This is Nesbø at his very best.

Harry is back in Oslo after a three year exile living in Hong Kong. No longer a policeman, he returns wearing the only suit he owns and has cleaned up his act and as a recovering alcoholic he faces temptation on every corner. This is personal and only Harry has the determination to see it through but is he ready to meet the truth. Can he handle the truth? Only time will tell.

A compelling read, Phantom is a taut and multi-layered thriller that simply deserves to be read and although a rather sombre read it will most definitely entertain. Rush out and get this one, it’s a cracker!

Published by Harvill Secker.

464 Pages ·  ISBN-10: 1846555213 ·  ISBN-13: 978-1846555213

Excellent reviews also available on Crimepieces & Crime Fiction Lover

Excellent reviews also available on Crimepieces & Crime Fiction Lover

Night School by Lee Child – Jack Reacher #21 – Thoughts

Night School by Lee Child

In the morning, they gave Reacher a medal. And in the afternoon, they sent him back to school.

It’s just a voice plucked from the air: ‘The American wants a hundred million dollars’.

For what? Who from? It’s 1996, and the Soviets are long gone. But now there’s a new enemy. In an apartment in Hamburg, a group of smartly-dressed young Saudis are planning something big.

Jack Reacher is fresh off a secret mission and a big win. The Army pats him on the back and gives him a medal. And then they send him back to school. It’s a school with only three students: Reacher, an FBI agent, and a CIA analyst. Their assignment? To find that American. And what he’s selling. And to whom. There is serious shit going on, signs of a world gone mad.

Night School takes Reacher back to his army days, but this time he’s not in uniform. With trusted sergeant Frances Neagley at his side, he must carry the fate of the world on his shoulders, in a wired, fiendishly clever new adventure that will make the cold sweat trickle down your spine.

Jack Reacher’s back for his 21st adventure, this time he does things a little differently, this time he’s going back to school – Night School, army style!

I’ve always enjoyed reading the Jack Reacher books and I guess I’d class myself as a fan, the Reacher series is a series I can’t wait to read. It’s not only the character that draws you in with this series; it’s the humour, literary subtlety, action and the storytelling. Who needs Bond or Bourne when you have Reacher to fight your corner?!

On the face of it there’s very little to the books. Reacher gets caught up in a situation at the beginning of the book and you know there’s really only one outcome – he has to put things right by the end. Simples. A, B, C. 1, 2, 3.

But here’s the hook, these aren’t simple books. From scene setting, character development, plotting and enough action to satisfy the most critical fan, these are complex stories written in such a way that make them easy to read and follow. You could say they’re infectious! I just adore the way the author adds complications as he goes along, it’s as if – half way through writing – he decides to make it even tougher for Reacher. Let’s face it Reacher has it easy! Just when you think things are reaching an explosive dénouement the author cranks it up and another sub plot is introduced, destined to make Reacher’s life a little more complicated.

There’s more than enough dry humour to satisfy everyone, the passages really made me smile! And of course Reacher has a dalliance or two – he deserves it, after all he is saving the world! Overall the book has a different feel about in from some of his previous books, I can’t put my finger on it but perhaps it’s the fact that Reacher goes back in time to his army days that has something to do with it. One this is certain, this is another great example of action and thriller writing at its best.

Outstanding.

  • Hardcover:400 pages
  • Publisher:Bantam Press (7 Nov. 2016)
  • Language:English
  • ISBN-10:0593073908
  • ISBN-13:978-0593073902

The House on Cold Hill by Peter James – Book Review

The House on Cold Hill

Moving from the heart of Brighton and Hove to the Sussex countryside is a big undertaking for Ollie and Caro Harcourt and their twelve-year-old daughter Jade. But when they view Cold Hill House – a huge, dilapidated Georgian mansion – Ollie is filled with excitement. Despite the financial strain of the move, he has dreamed of living in the country since he was a child, and he sees Cold Hill House as a paradise for his animal-loving daughter, the perfect base for his web-design business and a terrific long-term investment. Caro is less certain, and Jade is grumpy about being separated from her friends.

Within days of moving in, it becomes apparent that the Harcourt family aren’t the only residents of the house. A friend of Jade’s is the first to see the spectral woman, standing behind her as the girls talk on FaceTime. Then there are more sightings, as well as increasingly disturbing occurrences in the house. As the haunting becomes more malevolent and the house itself begins to turn on the Harcourts, the terrified family discover Cold Hill House’s dark history, and the horrible truth of what it could mean for them . . .

There’s not really much you can say about Peter James that hasn’t already been said. A terrific author who never seems to put a foot wrong, time after time he publishes a novel that is both engaging and fascinating to read. This time around he dispenses of Roy Grace’s services, heaven knows why because I for one would like to see Grace tackle a ghost! A standalone, The House on Cold Hill will have you shivering from the outset until a bone shaking finale.

I don’t get the chance to read ghost stories all that often, I did as a kid and loved them, but when I had the opportunity to read this title I jumped at the chance, it wasn’t the only time I’d jump while reading! The House on Cold Hill, although set in modern times, has a distinctly old fashioned style to it. I couldn’t help but think, despite the inclusion of computers and mobile phones, that I had been transported back to the old days of no electricity, no running water and reading by candlelight – no idea why, it just had that feel about it for me.

The first few chapters serve to set the story, lay a solid foundation – despite the possibility of subsidence!! – and introduce the characters to the reader but once all this has been achieved there’s no holding back and the story moves along at a rapid pace. Ollie is without question the star of the show and he proves to be a great protagonist. Worried about making a huge financial mistake in moving lock, stock and barrel to the country he’s prepared to ignore the warning signs and the fact that the small problems that immediately start to surface are in fact just the tip of the iceberg.

You can’t help but feel empathy with the family and how they put up with the problems is beyond me! They really do endure a lot but their hardship serves to entertain the reader! I know it’s a cruel world isn’t it! As long as it’s not happening to us, suck it up!!

A chilling read, I loved the way the story unfolded and how the ghostly activities increased as it became clear the Harcourt family wouldn’t be giving up without a fight. Characters come and go, some a little more gruesome than others, but the story continues to progress and flow well. Haunting in parts, there were a couple of points in the book that really freaked me out, the author has a knack for this genre.

So there we have it, not going to spoil it for anyone and give away any clues but the ending is very well done and just about right but if ever there was a book that had an alternative ending chapter then this is one! Now there’s a thought! Has that ever been done?

Bravo Mr James

Published by Macmillan ISBN-10:1447255909 ISBN-13:978-1447255901

  • ISBN-10:1447255909
  • ISBN-10:1447255909
  • ISBN-13:978-1447255901

Sycamore Row by John Grisham – Thoughts

For almost a quarter of a century, John Grisham’s A Time to Kill has captivated readers with its raw exploration of race, retribution, and justice. Now, its hero, Jake Brigance, returns to the courtroom in a dramatic showdown as Ford County again confronts its tortured history. Filled with the intrigue, suspense and plot twists that are the hallmarks of the world’s favourite storyteller, SYCAMORE ROW is the thrilling story of the elusive search for justice in a small American town.

Reading the first fifty pages of Sycamore Row I experienced two very different emotions. Firstly, and I can’t remember this happening before, I couldn’t help but grin as I lost myself in every page, in fact I wasn’t aware I was grinning until I heard my mobile ringing and looked away from the book – smiling! The second emotion was anger. Not of Grisham’s writing, his narrative or style, but Seth’s distant family. Racist, obnoxious, opinionated and just plain vile – you can’t help but feel for Lettie the black housekeeper, a housekeeper tasked with looking after the house and an ailing Seth Hubbard for the last three years. Upon his death and his family’s arrival Lettie is cast aside like a mess on a shoe, left to fend for her family and unemployed.

Now that I’ve finished Sycamore Row I can categorically say that those emotions never went away. They would bubble and fester, they weren’t always present but it was as if they were stuck in limbo, waiting to emerge just like a pocket of air escaping water throughout the entire story. You never quite knew where the bubble would burst but you knew it would at some point.

This is without doubt the best legal thriller I’ve read this year, hands down the best. Set at a terrific pace this multi layered story evolves and evolves and just when you think it can’t go anywhere, that the end is in nigh, the book suddenly branches off in a fresh direction, a new perspective, and Grisham introduces a new witness or a different focus to the investigation. This really is clever and sharp witted stuff!

Characterisation is key to any book and it was so satisfying for me to find out what happens to Jake Brigance and his family following the trial of Carl Lee Hailey. Three years down the line he’s still dining out on the plaudits and fame from the case – even if the money and rewards aren’t as forthcoming – and finds himself stuck in a rut doing the same old cases day in day out. Our protagonist had hoped to have moved on to bigger and better things but alas his loss is our literary gain.

John Grisham has brought together an eclectic mix of old and new characters. They all play their part in a legal thriller that is both entertaining and evocative. Even the nasty characters are enjoyable; they all help to add depth and colour to the book but Jake, Ozzie and Lucien carry the book as far as I’m concerned.

I enjoyed where the book takes the reader and where it ends and hopefully in a few years’ time we’ll be allowed to revisit Ford County and experience life in Reuben Atlee’s courtroom once again through the eyes of Jake Brigance. With sharp dialogue, atmospheric narrative and a sagacious storyline, Sycamore Row is one not to be missed. Highly recommended.

So Cold The River by Michael Koryta – Thoughts

So Cold The River by Michael Koryta

A man in a bowler hat, a haunting violin and a bottle of curious sulphuric tasting water. Did I mention water? Whatever you do, don’t drink the water. I repeat; don’t drink the water!

I’ve just re-read this classic book and can’t believe it has been seven years since I first read the book – my introduction to Michael Koryta – and it still ranks as one of my best ever reads.

So Cold The River by Michael Koryta is a hypnotic and hauntingly chilly tale following one man’s attempt to chronicle a family’s childhood history in West Baden, Indiana. It’s very hard to categorize into one genre as so many themes are utilized in this 528 huge page turner. Horror, thriller, Crime and supernatural forces are all present in a stunning story of murder, greed and deceit.

Eric Shaw, a has-been cinematographer formerly of Los Angeles and now Chicago, has resorted to making small videos for funerals at the bequest of grieving families. Shaw is approached by Alyssa Bradford at the end of her sister’s funeral and offers him a job to investigate/document her father in law’s (Campbell Bradford) family, long since forgotten.

The video is to be a celebration of his life, one she wants completed before he dies so that the family as a whole can enjoy with him. Shaw accepts not only the $20,000 offer but an ancient blue bottle of Pluto mineral water.

The bottle had never been opened and belongs to Campbell Bradford, the 95 year old multi-millionaire who lies dying in a lonely hospital room. Although hidden away, and until this point had never left Bradford’s side, Alyssa Bradford sensed its importance. The blue bottle sparks a chain of events that would lead to a destructive and devastating conclusion.

Shaw, estranged from his wife Claire, makes his way to the adjoined Midwest towns of West Baden and French Lick armed with a camera and the curious, foul tasting bottle of Pluto Water. Shortly before he embarked on the drive to Indiana Eric gave in to the temptation and opened the bottle and took a sip of the mysterious water. He became violently ill and the die had been cast.

Despite being a monster of a book, the pace is rather interesting. It isn’t a quick read for obvious reasons but I found that as the story developed so did the pace, hand in hand with the water’s stranglehold and intensity. I’m not sure if Koryta meant this to happen but this is how I saw the book evolving. Very clever and the flow is just right, I finished the book in three reasonable sessions.

We meet a number of colourful characters along the way and Josiah Bradford, the only living descendant of the millionaire in Indiana is one of them. An evil brute of a man, he appears to have a chip on his shoulder, a chip that grows rapidly after coming into physical contact with Eric. Koryta tells his story well and whenever Josiah is centre stage it’s as if the book takes on a whole new dark persona.

A story of Yin and Yang, light and shade, good and evil – the book is an engaging, icy page turner in every sense. This is Koryta’s first book to be published in the UK and certainly won’t be his last, not on this form I suspect.

Don’t drink the water! You have been warned!